Clarifications of Sub-Assignments

LAC-2018-7-v4 LAC-2018-7-v5 Vs
Referencias:
Nuevo
Eliminado
Modificado
Autores

Nombre: Jordi Palet Martinez
Email: jordi.palet@consulintel.es
Organización: The IPv6 Company

Nombre: Jordi Palet Martinez
Email: jordi.palet@consulintel.es
Organización: The IPv6 Company

Resumen

The IPv4 policy on direct assignments by LACNIC to end users addresses sub-delegations (2.3.3.4) and specifically prohibits sub-delegating to third parties.

The IPv6 policy contains no such explicit prohibition, except in the case of micro-assignments (LACNIC shall not make micro-assignments, 4.5.5).

However, section 1.9 “Definitions” – which applies to all LACNIC policies – explicitly prohibits such assignments, stating that “Assignments... are not to be sub-assigned to other parties.”

This proposal seeks to clarify the text of the IPv6 policy in this regard and better define the concept, particularly considering new uses for IPv6 (RFC 8273).

Finally, the proposal seeks to harmonize the spelling of certain terms formed with the prefixes “micro", “macro", “sub” and others, specifically in the Spanish version of the Manual.

The IPv4 policy on direct assignments by LACNIC to end users addresses sub-delegations (2.3.3.4) and specifically prohibits sub-delegating to third parties.

The IPv6 policy contains no such explicit prohibition, except in the case of micro-assignments (LACNIC shall not make micro-assignments, 4.5.5).

However, section 1.9 “Definitions” – which applies to all LACNIC policies – explicitly prohibits such assignments, stating that “Assignments... are not to be sub-assigned to other parties.”

This proposal seeks to clarify the text of the IPv6 policy in this regard and better define the concept, particularly considering new uses for IPv6 (RFC 8273).

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Finally,
withn tSpanishe, prefixes (e.g., sub, micro", “metc.) should not be hyphenated. The policry Po"licy Manual, however, containsub” cases where they are hyphenated and others, where they are not. The specificroposally seeks to harmoninze the Spanish verspelliong of the Manual, removing all unnecessary hyphens.

Justificación

When the policy was designed, the concept of assignments/sub-assignments did not consider a practice that is very common in IPv4 and that is replicated and even amplified in IPv6: the use of IP addresses for point-to-point links or VPNs.

In the case of IPv4, the use of NAT is widespread, so there are no implications. However, institutions not using NAT have the same problem as in IPv6.

In the case of IPv6, instead of unique addresses, the use of unique prefixes (/64) is increasingly common.

Likewise, the policy failed to consider the use of IP addresses in hotspots, the use of IP addresses by guests or employees (Bring Your Own Device, BYOD) and other similar cases.

Another example is the case of an end user who hires another company to provide certain services for which they must deploy their own devices, including their own servers, network equipment, etc. For example, a security surveillance service might require their clients to provide their own cameras, their own recording systems, and even their own firewalls and/or their own router for a dedicated VPN, etc. Of course, in many cases, this video surveillance system may require using the end user's address space.

Finally, the IETF has recently approved the use of a unique /64 prefix per interface/host (RFC8273) instead of a unique address. This, for example, allows users to connect to a hotspot, receive a /64 such that they are “isolated” from other users (for reasons of security, regulatory requirements, etc.) and they can also use multiple virtual machines on their devices with a unique address for each one (within the same /64).

In the Spanish version of the manual, words beginning with the prefixes “micro”, “macro”, “sub” and others are sometimes spelled with a hyphen and others without. The idea is to try to harmonize the spelling of these words.

When the policy was designed, the concept of assignments/sub-assignments did not consider a practice that is very common in IPv4 and that is replicated and even amplified in IPv6: the use of IP addresses for point-to-point links or VPNs.

In the case of IPv4, the use of NAT is widespread, so there are no implications. However, institutions not using NAT have the same problem as in IPv6.

In the case of IPv6, instead of unique addresses, the use of unique prefixes (/64) is increasingly common.


Likewise, the policy failed to consider the use of IP addresses in hotspots (when these are not ISPs, e.g., when they are associations or community networks), the use of IP addresses by guests or employees (Bring Your Own Device, BYOD), and other similar cases.

Another example is the case of an end user who hires another company to provide certain services for which they must deploy their own devices, including their own servers, network equipment, etc. For example, a security surveillance service might require their clients to provide their own cameras, their own recording systems, and even their own firewalls and
/or their own router for a dedicated VPN, etc. Of course, in many cases, this video surveillance system may require using the end user's address space.

Finally, the IETF has recently approved the use of a unique /64 prefix per interface/host (RFC8273) instead of a unique address. This, for example, allows users to connect to a hotspot, receive a /64 such that they are “isolated” from other users (for reasons of security, regulatory requirements, etc.) and they can also use multiple virtual machines on their devices with a unique address for each one (within the same /64).

In
the Spanddish verstion of, thyphe manual, wtiords beginning with theof prefixes “micro”, “macro”,s “sub”sed in pandrts of ther Spanish arve rsometimeson spelledof withe Ma hyphenual (“-sub”, “-micro” and others without). The idea is to try to harmonize the spelling of these words.

Texto Actual

Current text:

1.9 Assignments
To assign means to delegate address space to an end user, to be specifically used within the Internet infrastructure said end user operates. Assignments must only be made for specific purposes documented by specific organizations, and are not to be sub-assigned to other parties.

New text:

1.9 Assignments
To assign means to delegate address space to an end user, to be specifically used within the Internet infrastructure said end user operates.

Point-to-point links, VPNs and the like are considered part of said infrastructure and, therefore, the assignment of addresses to both endpoints of said link is allowed.

The assigned address space must only be used by the original recipient of the assignment, as well as for third-party devices, as long as they are operating within the infrastructure of said original recipient.

Sub-assigning address space to other parties, for example, for broadband services, to be used in place of LIR/ISP space is a sub-assignment and is therefore not allowed.

To avoid duplications and confusion, the last sentence of the first paragraph of section 2.3.3.4 is deleted. Assignments to End Users:
“...but not for sub-delegation outside their organization.”

To avoid duplications and confusion, the last paragraph of section 4.5.5 is deleted. IPv6 Micro-Assignments:
“Organizations receiving micro-assignments shall not sub-assign these IP addresses.”

Likewise, LACNIC staff will harmonize the spelling of words beginning with the prefixes “micro”, “sub” or others throughout the Spanish version of the manual.

Current text:


1.9 Assignments
To assign means to delegate address space to an end user, to be specifically used within the Internet infrastructure said end user operates. Assignments must only be made for specific purposes documented by specific organizations, and are not to be sub-assigned to other parties.


New text:


1.9 Assignments
To assign means to delegate address space to an end user, to be
spexclusificalvely used within the Internet infrastructure said end user operates.

Point-to-point
d links,by VPNs anid the like are cond usidered, part of said infrastructurwell and,s therefore, the assignment of addresses to brcoth endpoinects iof said link ipurpos alloweds.

The assigned address space must only be used by the original recipient of the assignment, as well as for third-party devices
, as lprong asvided they are operating within thesaid infrastructure of said original recipient.

STherefore, sub-assignimeng addrests space to otheird parties, outside said infrastructure (for example, forthe bruse oadbaf end -userv assicgnments, tfor beISPs uor similar clients) and providing placddresses tof LIR/ISPthird spacrties isn da sub-tassignm centers (and is otherefos) are not allowed.

To avoid duplications and confusion, the last sentence of the first paragraph of section 2.3.3.4
is deleted. (Assignments to End -Users) is deleted:
“...but not for sub-delegation outside their organization.”


To avoid duplications and confusion, the last paragraph of section 4.5.5
is deleted. IPv6 (Micro-Assignments in IPv6) is deleted:
“Organizations receiving micro-assignments shall not sub-assign these IP addresses.”

Likewise, LACNIC staff will harmonize the spelling
(hyphenation) of words beginning with the prefixes “micro”, “sub” orand others throughout the Spanish version of the manual.

Texto Nuevo

Current text:

1.9 Assignments
To assign means to delegate address space to an end user, to be specifically used within the Internet infrastructure said end user operates. Assignments must only be made for specific purposes documented by specific organizations, and are not to be sub-assigned to other parties.

New text:

1.9 Assignments
To assign means to delegate address space to an end user, to be specifically used within the Internet infrastructure said end user operates.

Point-to-point links, VPNs and the like are considered part of said infrastructure and, therefore, the assignment of addresses to both endpoints of said link is allowed.

The assigned address space must only be used by the original recipient of the assignment, as well as for third-party devices, as long as they are operating within the infrastructure of said original recipient.

Sub-assigning address space to other parties, for example, for broadband services, to be used in place of LIR/ISP space is a sub-assignment and is therefore not allowed.

To avoid duplications and confusion, the last sentence of the first paragraph of section 2.3.3.4 is deleted. Assignments to End Users:
“...but not for sub-delegation outside their organization.”

To avoid duplications and confusion, the last paragraph of section 4.5.5 is deleted. IPv6 Micro-Assignments:
“Organizations receiving micro-assignments shall not sub-assign these IP addresses.”

Likewise, LACNIC staff will harmonize the spelling of words beginning with the prefixes “micro”, “sub” or others throughout the Spanish version of the manual.

Current text:


1.9 Assignments
To assign means to delegate address space to an end user, to be specifically used within the Internet infrastructure said end user operates. Assignments must only be made for specific purposes documented by specific organizations, and are not to be sub-assigned to other parties.


New text:


1.9 Assignments
To assign means to delegate address space to an end user, to be
spexclusificalvely used within the Internet infrastructure said end user operates.

Point-to-point
d links,by VPNs anid the like are cond usidered, part of said infrastructurwell and,s therefore, the assignment of addresses to brcoth endpoinects iof said link ipurpos alloweds.

The assigned address space must only be used by the original recipient of the assignment, as well as for third-party devices
, as lprong asvided they are operating within thesaid infrastructure of said original recipient.

STherefore, sub-assignimeng addrests space to otheird parties, outside said infrastructure (for example, forthe bruse oadbaf end -userv assicgnments, tfor beISPs uor similar clients) and providing placddresses tof LIR/ISPthird spacrties isn da sub-tassignm centers (and is otherefos) are not allowed.

To avoid duplications and confusion, the last sentence of the first paragraph of section 2.3.3.4
is deleted. (Assignments to End -Users) is deleted:
“...but not for sub-delegation outside their organization.”


To avoid duplications and confusion, the last paragraph of section 4.5.5
is deleted. IPv6 (Micro-Assignments in IPv6) is deleted:
“Organizations receiving micro-assignments shall not sub-assign these IP addresses.”

Likewise, LACNIC staff will harmonize the spelling
(hyphenation) of words beginning with the prefixes “micro”, “sub” orand others throughout the Spanish version of the manual.

Información Adicional

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Referencias

A similar proposal was discussed in the RIPE region and the change was approved, although there is no consensus regarding the changes specified in this proposal, as they are different.

A similar proposal was discussed in the RIPE region and the change was approved, although there is no consensus regarding the changes specified in this proposal, as they texts are different. However, a version equivalent to this proposal is under discussion. Likewise, equivalent texts are being discussed in the AfrtiNIC and APNIC regions