Adapting the allocation / assignment policy for IPv4 exhaustion.

Original Language Español Date Published 25/11/2013 Last Modified 14/04/2014
Last Call for Comments Period 24/01/2014 - 14/02/2014 Date Ratified 25/03/2014 Implementation Date 15/08/2014
Status Implemented Download TXT PDF XML DOCX
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Authors

Name: Carlos Plasencia
Email: carlos.plasencia@outlook.com
Organization: BT

General opinion

Proposal Data

Policy Type: Expedited
Id: LAC-2013-3
Last version: 2
Presented at: LACNIC 20

Summary

This policy seeks to increase the size of the reserves created considering IPv4 exhaustion, increasing the IPv4 pool reserved for new members from a /12 to a /11 (policy 11.1) and increasing the pool reserved for gradual exhaustion (policy 11.2) from a /12 to a /11. In addition, repeat requests for address space for critical infrastructure, if justified, should be allowed. The proposal also seeks to use the term "gradual" instead of "suave" and "gradativo" instead of "tranquilo" in the Spanish and Portuguese versions of the text, respectively, in order to harmonize the terminology used in the various languages spoken in our region.

Rationale

Based on the size of IPv4 reserves, the number of requests considering LACNIC's current membership, and how other RIRs have managed IPv4 exhaustion in their respective regions, we propose increasing the size of the existing reserve.

By mid-2013, LACNIC had more than 3000 members. In addition, according to the trends observed in LACNIC membership growth charts, 600 new members have joined the organization each year for the past two years.
As each /12 block contains 1024 /22 blocks, current reserves do not appear to be large enough to allow a smooth transition to IPv6 in our region

Another important aspect that needs to be considered is addressing for critical infrastructure, as current exhaustion-related policies do not include any specific provisions for repeat assignments to critical infrastructure.

Given the importance of this type of organizations, we believe they should be able to request resources when needed. As policies currently stand, once policy 11.2 comes into force, these organizations will only be allowed to
request resources once every 6 months; furthermore, when policy 11.1 comes into force, they will be unable to request any further resources unless they qualify as a new member and, even in this case, they will only be able to submit one request. This policy proposes that organizations qualifying as critical infrastructure should be able to request up to a /22 when needed, both from the reserve described in 11.1 as well as from the reserve described in 11.2, until they finally complete their transition to IPv6.

Because the manual must be translated into three different languages (Spanish, Portuguese and English), we propose modifying the terminology used in section 11.2 in order to harmonize the meaning in all three languages, using the term gradual instead of suave in Spanish and gradativo instead of tranquilo in Portuguese.

Text

This proposal only affects section 11 of the Policy Manual as described below.

11.1 Special IPv4 Allocations/Assignments Reserved for New Members

1. LACNIC will create a reserve equivalent to a /11 block of IPv4 addresses for new LACNIC members.

2. No IPv4 allocations or assignments will be made to organizations that have already been assigned or allocated IPv4 resources by LACNIC or by the organizations that preceded LACNIC in the region currently serviced by LACNIC.

3. Under this policy, IPv4 address requests classified as critical infrastructure according to the LACNIC policies in force may receive addresses, even if they have already been assigned IPv4 resources by LACNIC.

4. LACNIC may only make IPv4 allocations or assignments greater than or equal to a /24 and smaller than or equal to a /22 from this reserve pool.

5. LACNIC will only allocate or assign resources from this reserve after approval of the first IPv4 address request that cannot be satisfied in full due to lack of IPv4 resources in the LACNIC region.

6. Once this policy comes into force, IPv4 resource applications smaller than a /22 that are pending approval may only receive a /22

7. Those organizations that receive IPv4 resources under the terms set forth in the following policy may not receive from LACNIC additional IPv4 resources that are part of this reserve, with the exception of requests for critical infrastructure.

8. Blocks received under this policy may not be transferred as specified in paragraph 2.3.2.18 of the policy manual for a period of one year. The same applies to its sub-blocks, i.e., blocks consisting of a subset of the IPv4 addresses contained in the block.

9. This policy does not replace section 11.1 of the Policy Manual. The reserve created under section 11.2 is independent from the reserve created under the following policy.

10. If the applicant has not already been assigned an IPv6 address block by LACNIC, it must also request an IPv6 address block in accordance with the applicable policy.

As to allocations/assignments for gradual IPv4 resource exhaustion, the policy manual shall be modified as follows.

11.2. Allocations/Assignments for Gradual IPv4 Resource Exhaustion

1. LACNIC will create a reserve equivalent to a /11 block of IPv4 addresses for the purpose of achieving gradual exhaustion of IPv4 resources within the LACNIC region.

2. LACNIC may only make IPv4 allocations or assignments greater than or equal to a /24 and smaller than or equal to a /22 from this reserve pool.

3. LACNIC will only allocate or assign resources from this reserve after approval of the first IPv4 address request that cannot be satisfied in full due to lack of IPv4 resources in the LACNIC region.

4. Once this policy comes into force, IPv4 resource applications smaller than a /22 that are pending approval may only receive a /22.

5. Organizations receiving IPv4 resources under the terms set forth in the following policy may receive additional IPv4 resources from LACNIC after a period of six months, provided that they generate a new request that justifies the need for additional IPv4 resources according to the IPv4 address allocation or assignment policies in force. Organizations requesting address blocks for critical infrastructure may request up to a /22 at any time.

6. Blocks received under this policy may not be transferred as specified in paragraph 2.3.2.18 of the policy manual for a period of one year. The same applies to its sub-blocks, i.e., blocks consisting of a subset of the IPv4 addresses contained in the block.

7. This proposal does not replace section 11.1 of the Policy Manual. The reserve created under section 11.1 is independent from the reserve created under this proposal.

Additional Information

In Section 11.1, this version simplifies the adaptation and removes the need for the requesting organization to submit evidence of efficient utilization of at least 80% of its resources and an action plan showing how IPv6 will be implemented.
In Section 11.2, this version replaces the terms "suave" and "tranquilo" with "gradual" and "gradativo" in Spanish and Portuguese, respectively, simplifies the adaptation and removes the need for the requesting organization to submit evidence of efficient utilization of at least 80% of its resources and an action plan showing how IPv6 will be implemented. In addition, paragraph 6 is also eliminated, as it created a redundancy in terms of the amount of time an organization must wait before making a new application (6 months).

Timetable

Inmediata

References

NO